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Ice Maker Doesn't Turn Off or Freezes

Does your ice maker need repair? Here are DIY tips for two simple ice maker repairs.

Ice Maker Doesn’t Turn Off

If your ice maker keeps making ice, even when it is full:

ice maker repair

Lift the bail wire above the ice collection drawer to shut off the ice.

1Lift the bail wire to shut it off.

 

2Empty the bin, remove the ice maker, clean it, and then reinstall it.

3If the problem persists, consider having an appliance repair person remove and replace the entire ice maker and valve. With this type of problem, you can have it repaired, but it’s often wiser and less expensive in the long run to replace the unit entirely.

Ice Maker Is Frozen Up

This ice maker repair is even easier. If your ice maker has frozen up, take the following steps to thaw it out:[GARD align=”right”]

1Unplug the refrigerator.

 

2Remove the ice bin and any loose ice from the ice maker.

 

3Find the fill tube, the white rubber-like hose that delivers water to the ice maker.

4Pull down the small metal clip off the housing that holds the fill tube (though not all ice makers have this clip).

5Warm the hose and surrounding mechanism. To do this, you can train a hair dryer on the ice maker to melt any ice blocking the mechanism. But be very careful (sop up any dripping water with a rag) as electricity and water can present a serious risk of electrical shock. Also, be careful not to melt the plastic parts.

6If you don’t want to use a hair dryer, you can soak the supply tubing with hot water, using a turkey baster and catching the overflow in the empty ice maker bin. In some cases, it may be easier to remove the ice maker than to thaw out the fill tube.

 

Featured Resource: Find a Local Appliance Repair Pro

Call for free estimates from local appliance pros now:
[telnumlink] 1-866-342-3263[/telnumlink]

Ice Maker Doesn’t Turn Off or Freezes

Does your ice maker need repair? Here are DIY tips for two simple ice maker repairs.

Ice Maker Doesn’t Turn Off

If your ice maker keeps making ice, even when it is full:

ice maker repair

Lift the bail wire above the ice collection drawer to shut off the ice.

1Lift the bail wire to shut it off.

 

2Empty the bin, remove the ice maker, clean it, and then reinstall it.

3If the problem persists, consider having an appliance repair person remove and replace the entire ice maker and valve. With this type of problem, you can have it repaired, but it’s often wiser and less expensive in the long run to replace the unit entirely.

Ice Maker Is Frozen Up

This ice maker repair is even easier. If your ice maker has frozen up, take the following steps to thaw it out:[GARD align=”right”]

1Unplug the refrigerator.

 

2Remove the ice bin and any loose ice from the ice maker.

 

3Find the fill tube, the white rubber-like hose that delivers water to the ice maker.

4Pull down the small metal clip off the housing that holds the fill tube (though not all ice makers have this clip).

5Warm the hose and surrounding mechanism. To do this, you can train a hair dryer on the ice maker to melt any ice blocking the mechanism. But be very careful (sop up any dripping water with a rag) as electricity and water can present a serious risk of electrical shock. Also, be careful not to melt the plastic parts.

6If you don’t want to use a hair dryer, you can soak the supply tubing with hot water, using a turkey baster and catching the overflow in the empty ice maker bin. In some cases, it may be easier to remove the ice maker than to thaw out the fill tube.

 

Featured Resource: Find a Local Appliance Repair Pro

Call for free estimates from local appliance pros now:
[telnumlink] 1-866-342-3263[/telnumlink]

Selecting a Freezer Model

Most refrigerator/freezer makers also produce stand-alone freezers. Here’s a roundup of the offerings from five of the top manufacturers: Frigidaire, GE, Kenmore, Maytag, and Whirlpool.

Frigidaire

Frigidaire Upright Freezer

If you have a space that’s tall versus wide, you have two good choices of Frigidaire upright freezer. Capacity-wise, they are exactly the same. Both have 17 cubic feet of storage space and the same dimensions (64 1/2 inches in height, 32 inches in width, and 26 1/2 inches in depth).[GARD align=”left”]

Both models have an automatic frost-free feature (there is also a model with manual defrost, which runs $580). The bells and whistles are the major difference between the two—one model costs $699; the other $599.

What are you getting for that extra $100? A temperature alarm system (alerts you with a light and a buzzer if the freezer’s interior temperature becomes unsafe for proper food storage), a lock with pop-out key (keeps your freezer door shut and securely locked with a key that automatically ejects for child safety), and an extreme freezer (allows you to quick-freeze meats, poultry, produce, and dairy products to lock in flavor and minimize the risk of spoilage). It also includes a digital display mode, digital controls, and a door-jam alarm.

Frigidaire Chest Freezer

When it comes to chest freezers, the Frigidaire with the 13-cubic-foot capacity (shown at left) with manual defrost and drain, adjustable temperature control, a power-on light, and two Stor Mor lift out storage baskets comes highly recommended. This freezer ranks high for a reduced noise factor, energy efficiency, and temperature performance.

Your space needs to be 42 inches wide, 35 inches high, and 29 1/2 inches deep. This freezer is Frigidaire’s best bargain for large chest freezers at $430.

For small chest freezers, Frigidaire offers a “baby,” a 5-cubic-foot freezer for only $230 that has an adjustable temperature control and power-on light. Its dimensions are 27 inches wide, 34 inches high, and 23 inches deep. All Frigidaire chest freezers are manual defrost.

(GE) General Electric

General Electric offers three different uprights, all listing at $599. The first model has a 20-cubic-foot capacity with manual defrost but no adjustable temperature control, lock, interior lighting, nor recessed handle. It is 70 inches in height, 28 inches in width, and 32 inches in depth.

The other two uprights offer automatic defrost but are smaller, at 16 cubic feet. Both have adjustable temperature control, a lock, and interior lighting. Dimensions for these models are 64 inches in height, 32 inches in width, and 26 inches in depth. One has electronic controls with a reach-through handle. The other one doesn’t but does have a recessed handle with a bulk slide-out storage basket.

GE chest freezers, all with manual defrost, have the most variety to choose from, ranging in size from 24 cubic feet to 5 cubic feet in capacity and $819 to $199 in cost. There are 11 choices in all.

The middle-of-the-road version is the best bargain at $490, with a 14-cubic-foot capacity, four baskets, adjustable temperature control, a power-on light, lock, and interior light. It requires a space 48 inches wide, 35 inches tall, and 29 inches deep.

The best bargain for a “little guy” is the 5-cubic-foot chest for $199, which has adjustable temperature control, one basket, a power-on light, and a recessed handle. It is 28 inches wide, 33 inches high, and 22 inches deep.

Kenmore

Kenmore’s unusual black stainless-steel, 13-cubic-foot upright freezer is frost-free, has electronic temperature controls, a power-on light, lock, eight shelves, and a slide-out basket. It is not Energy Star certified and has no temperature alarm. It is 59 inches tall, 28 inches wide, and 28 1/2 inches deep; it lists at $519.

The Kenmore upright freezer with manual defrost has a 20-cubic-foot capacity but no temperature controls, no digital displays, no temperature alarm, and is also not Energy Star certified. It lists for $599.

The 20-cubic-foot upright option is frost-free and Energy Star certified, has a quick-freeze option, digital display controls, lock, temperature alarm system, four glass interior shelves, and two slide-out baskets. It lists for $699.

Both 20-cubic-foot uprights are 70 inches tall, 32 inches wide, and 28 1/2 inches deep.

Kenmore Chest Freezer

The Kenmore 24-cubic-foot chest model (shown at right) offers three lift-out baskets, a quick-freeze feature, digital display controls, a frost indicator button, lock, and temperature alarm. It is Energy Star certified and lists for $729.

For the best bargain in a Kenmore chest freezer, look at the 13-cubic-foot model, which lists for $569. It is the only chest freezer with automatic defrost, but it doesn’t have a temperature alarm nor is it Energy Star certified. It comes with a lock, a power-on light, two slide-out baskets, and four lift-out baskets.

Maytag

Maytag’s upright is a 15-cubic-foot freezer for $579. It has a fast-freeze setting, defrosts automatically, has controls that adjust the temperature, and a keyed lock.

Two types of chest freezers are offered: a 21-cubic-foot for $559 and a 14-cubic-foot for $429. The larger model has two baskets and a keyed lock on the outside; the smaller one is Energy Star certified, with a keyed lock and exterior mounted temperature control. Both are manual defrost.

Whirlpool

The upright freezer offered by Whirlpool is a bit smaller than most uprights, at 61 inches in height, 30 inches in width, and 31 inches in depth.[GARD align=”right”]

It comes with lots of bells and whistles: It is Energy Star certified, frost-free, has an adjustable temperature control, a temperature monitor alarm, a fast-freeze feature, an interior light, a power-indicator light, and eight interior shelves (three removable) and five door shelves. This model is also icemaker ready if you have a water hook-up. The price is $549.

For $449, Whirlpool’s chest freezer is Energy Star certified and has a temperature alarm, adjustable thermostat, power-indicator light, key-eject lock, interior light, commercial-rated power cord, and four baskets. Your space needs are 46 inches in width, 34 inches in height, and 29 1/2 inches in depth. Like most chest freezers, this model has only manual defrost.

 

Featured Resource: Find a Local Appliance Installation Pro

Call for free estimates from local appliance pros now:
[telnumlink] 1-866-342-3263[/telnumlink]

How to Buy a Used Refrigerator

When shopping for a refrigerator, you may find that a used refrigerator will meet your needs. Used refrigerators can offer obvious advantages in terms of cost savings, but it is important to consider a few issues before making your purchase:how to buy used refrigerator

First, measure the dimensions of the space where your refrigerator will go. This is important when buying any refrigerator, new or used, but you must be especially vigilant when buying a used appliance as you may not be able to return it if it doesn’t fit.

Make sure the refrigerator and freezer doors have a correct seal—a door that leaks air will gobble up energy dollars. An easy way to test for air leakage is to close the door on a piece of paper; when you attempt to pull out the page, you should feel some resistance. A poor seal could signify a bad gasket around the door’s perimeter or hinges that need to be adjusted.

Another factor to consider is the direction the door opens. While most modern-day refrigerators offer doors that can be affixed on either side of the appliance, some older models do not offer this option. If the door swings in the wrong direction for your kitchen but you like the refrigerator, check to see whether the door can be reversed.

Look carefully inside the refrigerator and freezer to make sure all shelves and drawers are included and in good repair. Check the light switches and control knobs for proper function. Check the temperature settings to ensure they reach and maintain the desired cooling temperatures; do this in the store, if possible.

Inspect the drip pan behind the bottom grille, as well as the condenser coils behind the back covering (sometimes these are on the bottom of the appliance). Damage or excessive dirt could be a bad sign, suggesting that the previous owner did not clean nor take care of the appliance properly or that the motor may have endured undue strain.

As a final consideration, take into account that no matter how well a used appliance was maintained, any refrigerator more than 10 years old will most likely not be as energy efficient as a model you could purchase new today. Be sure that the immediate savings in the upfront cost of the appliance are worth the higher energy bills you may pay year after year.

Wine Cooler Refrigerators

Wine refrigerator keeps quality wines at the perfect temperature.JM-Design / Shutterstock.com

Wine refrigerator keeps quality wines at the perfect temperature and humidity levels.

If you are a wine enthusiast, a wine cooler (also known as a wine refrigerator) may be the perfect addition to your kitchen.

An under-counter wine-cooler refrigerator may hold from 20 to 60 bottles of wine.

These pint-sized refrigerators store wine at the optimum temperature and humidity for proper aging and enjoyment.

Some models are meant to be freestanding, but most are intended to be built into the kitchen cabinetry under the countertop.

Depending upon the model, a wine cooler can hold between 20 and 60 bottles of wine.

Most wine refrigerators have two separate zones: one for red wines and another for white wines. The door is generally made of amber or tinted glass to allow viewing of the refrigerator’s contents while protecting the wine from exposure to light.

Typical features include adjustable or slide-out shelves, programmable digital controls, and door locks for security.

The sleek wine cooler shown here stores up to 24 bottles and comes with an electronic thermostat and interior lighting.
Featured Resource: Find a Local Appliance Installation Pro

Call for free estimates from local appliance pros now:
[telnumlink] 1-866-342-3263[/telnumlink]