Wood Board & Shingle Siding | HomeTips
Select Page
url is http://dev.hometips.com/category/roofing-siding/wood-board-shingle-siding

Cutting & Fastening Lap Siding

This is a continuation of the article How to Install Lap Siding.

Because you’ll be doing a considerable amount of cutting—and accuracy is critical—either buy or rent a power miter saw or a radial-arm saw for the job. You can cut using a circular saw but the going will be slow and less accurate.

Install a starter strip along the bottom edge of the wall. Be sure it's level.

Before installing the siding material, you’ll need to attach trim at corners and a level starter strip along the bottom edge of the wall.

If the house’s sheathing is plywood, you can drive nails just about anywhere, but it is best to drive nails into studs to ensure firmness. If the sheathing is fiberboard, gypsum, or other soft material, then you can fasten only to studs.[GARD align=”left”]

Consult the manufacturer’s literature and with local builders for the best type of nails to use. Siding nails typically are thin, with small heads. Ring-shank nails hold better than standard nails.

Wherever you will drive a nail less than 3 inches from a board’s end, drill a pilot hole first to prevent cracking the board.

1Install trim and starter strip, as shown in the photo above. To trim an inside corner, nail a piece of 1×1 (which you can rip yourself from a 1x board) or 2×2. At an outside corner, use a 1×3 and a 1×4, or a 1×2 and a 1×3. (The side with the narrower piece will look nearly as wide as the other because of the thickness of the other piece.) Install all trim pieces around windows and doors. At the bottom, install a starter strip supplied by the manufacturer, or install a 1×2. See that the starter board is level. Go all around the house with the starter board to make sure you will come out at the same level when the boards meet at the final corner.

2Install the first siding board at the bottom. Snap a chalk line to guide the top of the bottom board. Cut the board to fit snugly between the trim boards; if it is longer than 6 feet, it is best if you have to slightly bend it to make it fit between trim boards. Align the board with the chalk line and drive nails every 6 inches or so into the starter strip.

Install the first siding board along the base, overlapping the starter strip.

Install the first siding board along the base, overlapping the starter strip.

 

3Lay out with a story pole. To help with the layout, make a story pole. This is simply a board marked with evenly spaced lines that indicate the reveal you have chosen. Hold the story pole at the correct height at each inside and outside corner and mark the trim boards for the locations of the siding board bottoms.

Create and use a story pole to transfer marks for each siding board at the corners.

Create and use a story pole to transfer marks for each siding board at the corners.

Also use the story pole to mark window and door frames.

Also use the story pole to mark window and door frames.

4Mark trim boards. Again using the story pole, mark the trim pieces around windows and doors. Be sure to hold the pole at the exact same height every time you mark trim boards.

5Install the second siding board. Cut and position the second-from-the-bottom siding board so it aligns with the layout marks you made with the story pole. Check for level to be sure your layout marks are correct. This piece will lap over the bottom board. In certain installations, nails are driven through the bottom of the siding, leaving the heads exposed. In other installations, nails are driven into the upper portion of the boards so they will be hidden by the succeeding piece. Follow the recommendations of your siding manufacturer.

Position and nail the next siding board, placing and spacing nails as recommended by the manufacturer.

Position and nail the next siding board, placing and spacing nails as recommended by the manufacturer.

 

6Make butt joints. If a single board will not span all the way between trim pieces, you will need to make a butt joint. Cut the boards so they meet in the middle of a stud. Test to make sure you have a tight fit and then apply caulk to both board ends. Drill pilot holes before driving in the nails.

Join boards end-to-end over a stud location, predrill, caulk the joint, and nail.

Join boards end-to-end over a stud location, predrill, caulk the joint, and nail.

 

7Fit a gable. If you need to cut boards at angles to fit a pitched roof, hold a T bevel tool against the trim piece and the gable to get the angle of the cut. Tighten the wing nut and use the T bevel to mark boards for cutting.

Use a sliding T-bevel to transfer the angle of the roof to the siding boards for making the necessary cuts.

Use a sliding T-bevel to transfer the angle of the roof to the siding boards for making the necessary cuts.

 

Cutting & Fastening Lap Siding

This is a continuation of the article How to Install Lap Siding.

Because you’ll be doing a considerable amount of cutting—and accuracy is critical—either buy or rent a power miter saw or a radial-arm saw for the job. You can cut using a circular saw but the going will be slow and less accurate.

Install a starter strip along the bottom edge of the wall. Be sure it's level.

Before installing the siding material, you’ll need to attach trim at corners and a level starter strip along the bottom edge of the wall.

If the house’s sheathing is plywood, you can drive nails just about anywhere, but it is best to drive nails into studs to ensure firmness. If the sheathing is fiberboard, gypsum, or other soft material, then you can fasten only to studs.[GARD align=”left”]

Consult the manufacturer’s literature and with local builders for the best type of nails to use. Siding nails typically are thin, with small heads. Ring-shank nails hold better than standard nails.

Wherever you will drive a nail less than 3 inches from a board’s end, drill a pilot hole first to prevent cracking the board.

1Install trim and starter strip, as shown in the photo above. To trim an inside corner, nail a piece of 1×1 (which you can rip yourself from a 1x board) or 2×2. At an outside corner, use a 1×3 and a 1×4, or a 1×2 and a 1×3. (The side with the narrower piece will look nearly as wide as the other because of the thickness of the other piece.) Install all trim pieces around windows and doors. At the bottom, install a starter strip supplied by the manufacturer, or install a 1×2. See that the starter board is level. Go all around the house with the starter board to make sure you will come out at the same level when the boards meet at the final corner.

2Install the first siding board at the bottom. Snap a chalk line to guide the top of the bottom board. Cut the board to fit snugly between the trim boards; if it is longer than 6 feet, it is best if you have to slightly bend it to make it fit between trim boards. Align the board with the chalk line and drive nails every 6 inches or so into the starter strip.

Install the first siding board along the base, overlapping the starter strip.

Install the first siding board along the base, overlapping the starter strip.

 

3Lay out with a story pole. To help with the layout, make a story pole. This is simply a board marked with evenly spaced lines that indicate the reveal you have chosen. Hold the story pole at the correct height at each inside and outside corner and mark the trim boards for the locations of the siding board bottoms.

Create and use a story pole to transfer marks for each siding board at the corners.

Create and use a story pole to transfer marks for each siding board at the corners.

Also use the story pole to mark window and door frames.

Also use the story pole to mark window and door frames.

4Mark trim boards. Again using the story pole, mark the trim pieces around windows and doors. Be sure to hold the pole at the exact same height every time you mark trim boards.

5Install the second siding board. Cut and position the second-from-the-bottom siding board so it aligns with the layout marks you made with the story pole. Check for level to be sure your layout marks are correct. This piece will lap over the bottom board. In certain installations, nails are driven through the bottom of the siding, leaving the heads exposed. In other installations, nails are driven into the upper portion of the boards so they will be hidden by the succeeding piece. Follow the recommendations of your siding manufacturer.

Position and nail the next siding board, placing and spacing nails as recommended by the manufacturer.

Position and nail the next siding board, placing and spacing nails as recommended by the manufacturer.

 

6Make butt joints. If a single board will not span all the way between trim pieces, you will need to make a butt joint. Cut the boards so they meet in the middle of a stud. Test to make sure you have a tight fit and then apply caulk to both board ends. Drill pilot holes before driving in the nails.

Join boards end-to-end over a stud location, predrill, caulk the joint, and nail.

Join boards end-to-end over a stud location, predrill, caulk the joint, and nail.

 

7Fit a gable. If you need to cut boards at angles to fit a pitched roof, hold a T bevel tool against the trim piece and the gable to get the angle of the cut. Tighten the wing nut and use the T bevel to mark boards for cutting.

Use a sliding T-bevel to transfer the angle of the roof to the siding boards for making the necessary cuts.

Use a sliding T-bevel to transfer the angle of the roof to the siding boards for making the necessary cuts.

 

Board & Batten Siding

Board-and-batten siding

One of the earliest and most basic styles of wood house siding is board-and-batten, a type you’re likely to see on today’s ranch and country-style homes. As its name suggests, board-and-batten siding-sometimes called board-and-batt-is made by nailing boards vertically along a wall and then covering the spaces between the boards with narrow strips of wood called battens.

Batten-and-board siding is just the opposite; battens are applied first and then the boards. The boards, sometimes as narrow as a 1 by 4 but more typically 1 by 8s or larger, are spaced from 1/2 to 1 inch apart to allow for expansion; battens, normally 1 by 3s or 1 by 4s, are then nailed over the spaces.[GARD align=”left”]

Board-and-batten siding doesn’t seal out blustery weather quite as effectively as most types of lapping or interlocking horizontal siding, so it’s best reserved for temperate climates. Because it runs vertically, it can’t be nailed directly to wall studs; instead, it is applied over solid sheathing or fastened to horizontal nailers or blocking.

Though a variety of woods are used, cedar is popular because of its natural resistance to decay. All solid-wood sidings require treatment with water repellent, stain, or paint, and this finish must be regularly maintained.

Board & Batten Siding

Board-and-batten siding

One of the earliest and most basic styles of wood house siding is board-and-batten, a type you’re likely to see on today’s ranch and country-style homes. As its name suggests, board-and-batten siding-sometimes called board-and-batt-is made by nailing boards vertically along a wall and then covering the spaces between the boards with narrow strips of wood called battens.

Batten-and-board siding is just the opposite; battens are applied first and then the boards. The boards, sometimes as narrow as a 1 by 4 but more typically 1 by 8s or larger, are spaced from 1/2 to 1 inch apart to allow for expansion; battens, normally 1 by 3s or 1 by 4s, are then nailed over the spaces.[GARD align=”left”]

Board-and-batten siding doesn’t seal out blustery weather quite as effectively as most types of lapping or interlocking horizontal siding, so it’s best reserved for temperate climates. Because it runs vertically, it can’t be nailed directly to wall studs; instead, it is applied over solid sheathing or fastened to horizontal nailers or blocking.

Though a variety of woods are used, cedar is popular because of its natural resistance to decay. All solid-wood sidings require treatment with water repellent, stain, or paint, and this finish must be regularly maintained.

Wood Shingle & Shake Siding

Wood shingles and shakes, typically made of decay-resistant cedar, are prized for their rustic beauty and ability to adapt to intricate architectural styles. However, due to their high degree of flammability, many regions of the country have restricted them. In addition, shingles and shakes are prone to rot, splinter, crack, and cup. They can be pried loose by wind and change color if not properly maintained.cedar shingle wood roofing

Cedar shingles are graded #1 (“blue label”), the best, and #2 (“red label”), which are acceptable as underlayment when double-coursing (applying two layers). Widths are random-from 3 to 14 inches-and lengths are 16, 18, or 24 inches. Shingles are also available in specialty patterns.

Shakes are thicker than shingles, with butts 3/8 to 3/4 inch thick. They are primarily sold unpainted but are also available pre-stained, painted, and treated with fire retardant.

Depending on heat, humidity, and maintenance, shingles and shakes can last from 20 to 40 years. Maintenance in hot, humid climates requires applying a fungicide/mildew retardant every three years. In dry climates, preserve resiliency with an oil finish every five years.

Shakes and shingles are easy to handle and install, though the job is time-consuming. Still, it is manageable with basic carpentry skills and tools plus a roofer’s hatchet.

Get a Pre-Screened Local Wood Shingle Siding Contractor

Wood Shingle & Shake Siding

Wood shingles and shakes, typically made of decay-resistant cedar, are prized for their rustic beauty and ability to adapt to intricate architectural styles. However, due to their high degree of flammability, many regions of the country have restricted them. In addition, shingles and shakes are prone to rot, splinter, crack, and cup. They can be pried loose by wind and change color if not properly maintained.cedar shingle wood roofing

Cedar shingles are graded #1 (“blue label”), the best, and #2 (“red label”), which are acceptable as underlayment when double-coursing (applying two layers). Widths are random-from 3 to 14 inches-and lengths are 16, 18, or 24 inches. Shingles are also available in specialty patterns.

Shakes are thicker than shingles, with butts 3/8 to 3/4 inch thick. They are primarily sold unpainted but are also available pre-stained, painted, and treated with fire retardant.

Depending on heat, humidity, and maintenance, shingles and shakes can last from 20 to 40 years. Maintenance in hot, humid climates requires applying a fungicide/mildew retardant every three years. In dry climates, preserve resiliency with an oil finish every five years.

Shakes and shingles are easy to handle and install, though the job is time-consuming. Still, it is manageable with basic carpentry skills and tools plus a roofer’s hatchet.

Get a Pre-Screened Local Wood Shingle Siding Contractor

Pin It on Pinterest