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How to Repair a Leaky Shower Faucet

shower head leaks

When water constantly drools from the shower head, the problem is caused by the shower valve.

A leaky shower faucet or shower head can be both irritating and expensive. Beyond the annoying drip, drip, drip, a leaky shower faucet can waste hundreds of gallons of water every week. And worse, a leak on the hot water side of the shower valve can waste significant energy because the water heater must continually operate to warm the water being drawn unnecessarily. One reader whose home was equipped with an electric water heater complained that his leaking shower valve caused his electric bill to triple.

Even more concerning is the shower valve that leaks inside the wall. Over time, water dribbling into the wall can cause dry rot, mold, and structural problems that can be both hazardous and very expensive to repair.

What Causes a Leaky Shower Faucet or Shower Head Drip?

When water drips or drizzles from a shower head, there is a problem with the shower faucet (valve). In most cases, inner seals are worn, or parts have become corroded or clogged with hard water deposits. And the rubber O-rings and gaskets that seal connections between moving metal parts wear down with time and use. When they do, water squirts or drips out.

Advice for Fixing Leaky Shower Faucets

If you turn off a shower faucet and the water keeps dribbling out of the shower head, a natural instinct is to crank the handle closed as hard as you can. Unfortunately, this may only make things worse. Be sure the faucet handle is turned all of the way off, but don’t over-tighten it! This may damage the valve.

When working on shower faucets, place rags in the tub or shower floor beneath the faucets to protect the surfaces and prevent small parts from being dropped down the drain.

Before opening up a shower valve, turn off the water supply. In some houses, a shut-off valve is located in the bathroom, near the shower, or in the basement. If you can’t find the shower shut-off valves, turn off the water supply to the entire house. For more about this, see How to Shut Off the Water Supply.

If you have to shut off the water to the entire house, plan and organize accordingly. Read through all of the instructions and have the tools and materials that you’ll need readily on hand to minimize the time your home’s water will be off. (After shutting off the house water, faucets won’t work but each toilet will have one flush.)

After you’ve turned off the water supply, open the bathroom sink faucet to drain any water from the nearby pipes.

There are many types of shower faucet valves. The methods for fixing the leak will depend upon the type of shower valve. In the articles listed below, you will find step-by-step instructions for fixing the major brands of shower faucets.

How to Fix a Leaky Two-Handle Shower Faucet

A shower valve that’s operated by two faucet handles—one hot and one cold—is typically a compression faucet, as discussed in the article How a Compression Faucet Works.

Leaks in a compression faucet generally occur when a rubber seal or washer wears out over time, allowing water to seep between movable metal parts. Fixing a compression shower faucet involves disassembling the unit and replacing the defective washers and seals.

It’s important to shut off the water supply to the shower, and to protect the surface of the tub or shower floor and cover the drain. Buy a faucet washer kit so you’ll have the necessary replacement O-rings and washers on hand.

 

First, feel the water leaking from the tub spout or shower head. If it’s warm, you know that the leak is coming from the hot-water valve. If the water has been dripping for a while and it is cold, the leak is probably coming from the cold-water valve. 1Start by removing the faucet handle. Methods for doing this will depend upon the faucet’s design. Older or simply designed faucets often have an exposed screw front and center or a locking screw in the side. Newer and more decorative models of faucets hide the screw beneath a cover cap. With these, you need to pry off the cover cap to expose the screw. If your faucet handle is the type with a cover cap and there is no obvious method of removal, use a very thin screwdriver or pocketknife to pry the cap off. Be careful not to scratch the finish or damage the material. 2Once you’ve removed the cover cap, use a screwdriver to unscrew the locking screw, turning it counterclockwise. Remove it and set it aside. Then wiggle and pull on the handle to extract it from the faucet body. This can be difficult to do. You can buy a faucet puller, or improvise with a screwdriver as shown in this helpful video: http://youtu.be/y_DWX2oTYxo 3After removing the handle, remove the trim and the sleeve that fits over the faucet stem. You’ll need a deep socket, as shown in the video, to extract the faucet stem from the valve body. Fit it over the stem’s hex nut and turn it counterclockwise to unscrew the assembly. At first, you may need to apply significant force to break it free. Unscrew the faucet stem and pull it out of the valve body. 4Replace all O-rings, seals, and the flat washer at the end of the stem (remove the screw to replaced the washer). 5Then reverse the procedures to replace the faucet stem in the valve body. Before you put it in, lubricate the threads with plumber’s grease. Tighten it in the valve body. Temporarily put the handle back on, turn on the water supply, and test the valve. Then finish reassembly. Finally, seal the trim to the wall with tub caulk.

How to Fix a Leaky Delta Shower Faucet

If your shower has a leaky Delta shower faucet, here is how to stop the leak. Before beginning, please read the information titled “Advice for Fixing Leaky Shower Faucets” above. Shut off the water supply to the shower and protect the surface of the tub or shower floor. Also cover the drain so you don’t accidentally drop small parts down it. Buy a Delta replacement cartridge so you’ll have the necessary replacement on hand. Here’s a video that shows this process: http://youtu.be/O_ah4CMZgjE 1Remove the cover cap that hides the screw holding the handle, and then unscrew the handle and pull it off.   2Remove the two screws that hold escutcheon trim plate in place, and then pull the escutcheon plate away from the wall, exposing the hole in the wall around the valve.

 

3Slide off the outside sleeve (sometimes called a “stop tube”) by gripping it and pulling it outward. Then remove the brass bonnet with a pair of locking jaw pliers, turning it counterclockwise.

4Remove the old cartridge by pulling off the plastic cap, and then gripping and wiggling the cartridge until it’s loose enough to pull off. Feel inside the valve area for any deposits or loose particles, and clean with a rag.

5Then insert the new cartridge. Note that one side of the cartridge is marked “Hot” and should be positioned on the hot water (normally left) side. Push it firmly in place. If necessary, adjust the rotational limit stop, according to the manufacturer’s directions that come with the replacement cartridge.

6Put the brass bonnet back on the valve and turn it clockwise to tighten it. Be sure the threads grip properly. Hand-tighten, and then use locking jaw pliers to snug it down. Clean the wall where the escutcheon plate goes, and then put the outer sleeve back on the cartridge and push it into place. Replace the escutcheon plate and handle.

7Turn the water supply back on and, if everything works fine, caulk the perimeter of the escutcheon plate with tub caulk to seal it to the wall.

How to Fix a Leaky Price Pfister Shower Faucet

As when working on other types of shower valves, start by shutting off the water supply and protecting the tub and drain with rags. Ideally, your shower plumbing will have a local water supply valve that you can shut off (similar to the valve under a sink) that is accessible through a removable panel. In most cases, there isn’t one of these, so you’ll need to shut off the main valve for the entire house.

fix leaky price pfister shower faucet

Photo: Price Pfister

Open a nearby faucet to empty the shower pipes. Before beginning, please read the information titled “Advice for Fixing Leaky Shower Faucets” above.

If your defective shower valve is made by Price Pfister, you’ll be happy to know that they stand behind their products with a strong warranty. If you can prove that you bought their valve after 1997, they will send you free parts. It’s definitely worth a call to their 800 number at 1-800-732-8238.

1Pry the decorative button off of the end of the shower stem to expose the screw that secures the handle assembly. Use a Phillips screwdriver to remove the screw, turning it counterclockwise. Then remove the handle assembly.

2Next, unscrew the threaded sleeve, turning it counterclockwise, and remove it from the escutcheon trim plate. If the escutcheon trim is caulked to the wall, use a sharp knife to cut the seal. Be careful not to scratch the surfaces. Remove the plate from the wall.

3To remove the cartridge, unscrew the four screws that hold the dogged-eared mounting flange. Again, turn them counterclockwise to remove them. Reach in and pull the plastic cartridge out of the valve. Be sure the rubber O-rings come out with the cartridge.

4Use a rag and, if necessary, steel wool to clean the inner surfaces of the valve. Then replace the old plastic cartridge with a new one, and replace the threaded piece and the flange.

5Be sure the rubber gasket will seal properly. Position it so the orientation is properly aligned. Use the metal ring and four screws to secure it. When it’s tight, turn the water supply back on and check for leaks.

If you don’t discover any leaks, caulk around the perimeter of the trim and then replace the escutcheon trim and the handle.

Here is a really helpful video that shows this process.

How to Fix a Leaky Moen Shower Faucet

Before beginning a shower valve replacement, read the information titled “Advice for Fixing Leaky Shower Faucets” above. Shut off the water supply to the shower and protect the surface of the tub or shower floor. Also cover the drain to prevent accidentally dropping small parts down it. Buy a Moen replacement cartridge and have it on hand. Review the instructions that come with it.

1Pry off the plastic cover at the top of the control valve, and then remove the screw at the center of the knob, using a Phillips screwdriver. Unscrew the two screws that secure the escutcheon plate and pull the plate off of the wall. Gently pry it with a flat-bladed screwdriver if necessary. Be careful not to scratch the finish.

2Pull the stop tube straight out, sliding it off of the cartridge. Using a pair of pliers, pull the U-shaped cartridge retainer clip off of the valve body. Slide the small spacer washer off of the shaft and set it aside with the retainer clip.

3A white plastic nut-like tool should be packaged with the new cartridge. Slip this plastic nut tool over the shaft so it interlocks with the cartridge. Then turn it back and forth with pliers to release the cartridge from the valve body. Remove the nut, and then use pliers to grip the stem of the cartridge and pull it straight out of the valve body.

4Push the new replacement cartridge straight into the valve body until it seats. Slip the plastic nut tool onto the cartridge and orient the cartridge so that its ears are at the top and bottom of the valve body. Slide the U-shaped retainer clip back into the valve body until it snaps into place. If the retainer clip doesn’t snap into place properly, the cartridge is not seated correctly in the valve body—readjust it with the plastic nut tool.[GARD align=”right”]

5Now turn the water supply back on. Temporarily mount the faucet knob on the shaft. Holding a bucket under the shower head, turn on the hot water to make sure the hot water works. If the water doesn’t get hot, you’ll need to readjust the cartridge with the plastic nut tool and check again until you get hot water.

6Put the small spacer washer back onto the shaft. Slide the stop tube back onto the valve body. Replace the escutcheon plate and secure it with its two screws, turning them clockwise until snug. Put the plastic knob back on, screw it in place, and secure the cover plate over the screw.

Call for Free Estimates from Pros Now!
[telnumlink] 1-866-342-3263[/telnumlink]

Here is a helpful video that will guide you through this process from start to finish:

How to Repair a Leaky Shower Faucet Valve

shower head leaks

When water constantly drools from the shower head, the problem is caused by the shower valve.

A leaky shower faucet or shower head can be both irritating and expensive. Beyond the annoying drip, drip, drip, a leaky shower faucet (valve) can waste hundreds of gallons of water every week. And worse, a leak on the hot water side of the shower valve can waste significant energy because the water heater must continually operate to warm the water being drawn unnecessarily.

One reader whose home was equipped with an electric water heater complained that his leaking shower valve caused his electric bill to triple.[GARD align=”left”] Even more concerning is the shower valve that leaks inside the wall. Over time, water dribbling into the wall can cause dry rot, mold, and structural problems that can be both hazardous and very expensive to repair.

What Causes a Leaky Shower Faucet or Shower Head Drip?

When water drips or drizzles from a shower head, there is a problem with the shower faucet (valve). In most cases, inner seals are worn, or parts have become corroded or clogged with hard water deposits. And the rubber O-rings and gaskets that seal connections between moving metal parts wear down with time and use. When they do, water squirts or drips out. For more, please see How a Shower Works.

Advice for Fixing Leaky Shower Faucets

If you turn off a shower faucet and the water keeps dribbling out of the shower head, a natural instinct is to crank the handle closed as hard as you can. Unfortunately, this may only make things worse. Be sure the faucet handle is turned all of the way off, but don’t over-tighten it! This may damage the valve.

When working on shower faucets, place rags in the tub or shower floor beneath the faucets and over the drain to protect the surfaces and prevent small parts from being dropped down the drain. Before opening up a shower valve, turn off the water supply. In some houses, a shut-off valve is located in the bathroom, near the shower, or in the basement. If you can’t find the shower shut-off valves, turn off the water supply to the entire house. For more about this, see How to Shut Off the Water Supply.

expert home improvement adviceIf you have to shut off the water to the entire house, plan and organize ahead of time. Read through all of the instructions and have the tools and materials that you’ll need readily on hand to minimize the time your home’s water will be off—and alert your family. After shutting off the house water, faucets and water-using appliances won’t work but each toilet will have one flush.

After you’ve turned off the water supply, open the bathroom sink faucet to drain any water from the nearby pipes.

There are many types of shower faucet valves. The methods for fixing the leak will depend upon the type of shower valve. In the articles listed below, you will find step-by-step instructions for fixing the major brands of shower faucets.

How to Fix a Leaky Two-Handle Shower Faucet

A shower valve that’s operated by two faucet handles—one hot and one cold—is typically a compression faucet, as discussed in the article How a Compression Faucet Works. Leaks in a compression faucet generally occur when a rubber seal or washer wears out over time, allowing water to seep between movable metal parts. Fixing a compression shower faucet involves disassembling the unit and replacing the defective washers and seals. It’s important to shut off the water supply to the shower, and to protect the surface of the tub or shower floor and cover the drain. Buy a faucet washer kit so you’ll have the necessary replacement O-rings and washers on hand.

First, feel the water leaking from the tub spout or shower head. If it’s warm, you know that the leak is coming from the hot-water valve. If the water has been dripping for a while and it is cold, the leak is probably coming from the cold-water valve.

1Start by removing the faucet handle. Methods for doing this will depend upon the faucet’s design. Older or simply-designed faucets often have an exposed screw front and center or a locking screw in the side. Newer and more decorative models of faucets hide the screw beneath a cover cap. With these, you need to pry off the cover cap to expose the screw. If your faucet handle is the type with a cover cap and there is no obvious method of removal, use a very thin screwdriver or pocketknife to pry the cap off. Be careful not to scratch the finish or damage the material.

2Once you’ve removed the cover cap, use a screwdriver to unscrew the locking screw, turning it counterclockwise. Remove it and set it aside. Then wiggle and pull on the handle to extract it from the faucet body. This can be difficult to do. You can buy a faucet puller, or improvise with a screwdriver as shown in this helpful video:

3After removing the handle, remove the trim and the sleeve that fits over the faucet stem. You’ll need a plumber’s deep socket, as shown in the video, to extract the faucet stem from the valve body (you can buy an inexpensive set online). Fit it over the stem’s hex nut and turn it counterclockwise to unscrew the assembly. At first, you may need to apply significant force to break it free. Unscrew the faucet stem and pull it out of the valve body.

4Replace all faucet washers, O-rings, seals, and the flat washer at the end of the stem (remove the screw to replaced the washer).

5Then reverse the procedures to replace the faucet stem in the valve body. Before you put it in, lubricate the threads with plumber’s grease. Tighten it in the valve body. Temporarily put the handle back on, turn on the water supply, and test the valve. Then finish reassembly. Finally, seal the trim to the wall with tub caulk.

How to Fix a Leaky Delta Shower Faucet

If your shower has a leaky Delta shower faucet, here is how to stop the leak. Before beginning, please read the information titled “Advice for Fixing Leaky Shower Faucets” above. Shut off the water supply to the shower and protect the surface of the tub or shower floor. Also cover the drain so you don’t accidentally drop small parts down it. Buy a Delta replacement cartridge so you’ll have the necessary replacement on hand. Here’s a video that shows this process:

1Remove the cover cap that hides the screw holding the handle, and then unscrew the handle and pull it off.

2Remove the two screws that hold escutcheon trim plate in place, and then pull the escutcheon plate away from the wall, exposing the hole in the wall around the valve.

3Slide off the outside sleeve (sometimes called a “stop tube”) by gripping it and pulling it outward. Then remove the brass bonnet with a pair of locking jaw pliers, turning it counterclockwise.

4Remove the old cartridge by pulling off the plastic cap, and then gripping and wiggling the cartridge until it’s loose enough to pull off. Feel inside the valve area for any deposits or loose particles, and clean with a rag.

5Then insert the new cartridge. Note that one side of the cartridge is marked “Hot” and should be positioned on the hot water (normally left) side. Push it firmly in place. If necessary, adjust the rotational limit stop, according to the manufacturer’s directions that come with the replacement cartridge.

6Put the brass bonnet back on the valve and turn it clockwise to tighten it. Be sure the threads grip properly. Hand-tighten, and then use locking jaw pliers to snug it down. Clean the wall where the escutcheon plate goes, and then put the outer sleeve back on the cartridge and push it into place. Replace the escutcheon plate and handle.

7Turn the water supply back on and, if everything works fine, caulk the perimeter of the escutcheon plate with tub caulk to seal it to the wall.

How to Fix a Leaky Price Pfister Shower Faucet

As when working on other types of shower valves, start by shutting off the water supply and protecting the tub and drain with rags. Ideally, your shower plumbing will have a local water supply valve that you can shut off (similar to the valve under a sink) that is accessible through a removable panel. In most cases, there isn’t one of these, so you’ll need to shut off the main valve for the entire house.

[media-credit name=”Price Pfister” align=”alignright” width=”252″]fix leaky price pfister shower faucet[/media-credit]

Open a nearby faucet to empty the shower pipes. Before beginning, please read the information titled “Advice for Fixing Leaky Shower Faucets” above. If your defective shower valve is made by Price Pfister, you’ll be happy to know that they stand behind their products with a strong warranty. If you can prove that you bought their valve after 1997, they will send you free parts. It’s definitely worth a call to their 800 number at 1-800-732-8238. You can also buy a replacement valve on Amazon.

1Pry the decorative button off of the end of the shower stem to expose the screw that secures the handle assembly. Use a Phillips screwdriver to remove the screw, turning it counterclockwise. Then remove the handle assembly.

2Next, unscrew the threaded sleeve, turning it counterclockwise, and remove it from the escutcheon trim plate. If the escutcheon trim is caulked to the wall, use a sharp knife to cut the seal. Be careful not to scratch the surfaces. Remove the plate from the wall.

3To remove the cartridge, unscrew the four screws that hold the dogged-eared mounting flange. Again, turn them counterclockwise to remove them. Reach in and pull the plastic cartridge out of the valve. Be sure the rubber O-rings come out with the cartridge.

4Use a rag and, if necessary, steel wool to clean the inner surfaces of the valve. Then replace the old plastic cartridge with a new one, and replace the threaded piece and the flange.

5Be sure the rubber gasket will seal properly. Position it so the orientation is properly aligned. Use the metal ring and four screws to secure it. When it’s tight, turn the water supply back on and check for leaks. If you don’t discover any leaks, caulk around the perimeter of the trim and then replace the escutcheon trim and the handle. Here is a really helpful video that shows this process.

How to Fix a Leaky Moen Shower Faucet

Before beginning a shower valve replacement, read the information titled “Advice for Fixing Leaky Shower Faucets” above. Shut off the water supply to the shower and protect the surface of the tub or shower floor. Also cover the drain to prevent accidentally dropping small parts down it. Buy a Moen replacement cartridge and have it on hand.

1Pry off the plastic cover at the top of the control valve, and then remove the screw at the center of the knob, using a Phillips screwdriver. Unscrew the two screws that secure the escutcheon plate and pull the plate off of the wall. Gently pry it with a flat-bladed screwdriver if necessary. Be careful not to scratch the finish.

2Pull the stop tube straight out, sliding it off of the cartridge. Using a pair of pliers, pull the U-shaped cartridge retainer clip off of the valve body. Slide the small spacer washer off of the shaft and set it aside with the retainer clip.

3A white plastic nut-like tool should be packaged with the new cartridge. Slip this plastic nut tool over the shaft so it interlocks with the cartridge. Then turn it back and forth with pliers to release the cartridge from the valve body. Remove the nut, and then use pliers to grip the stem of the cartridge and pull it straight out of the valve body.

4Push the new replacement cartridge straight into the valve body until it seats. Slip the plastic nut tool onto the cartridge and orient the cartridge so that its ears are at the top and bottom of the valve body. Slide the U-shaped retainer clip back into the valve body until it snaps into place. If the retainer clip doesn’t snap into place properly, the cartridge is not seated correctly in the valve body—readjust it with the plastic nut tool.[GARD align=”right”]

5Now turn the water supply back on. Temporarily mount the faucet knob on the shaft. Holding a bucket under the shower head, turn on the hot water to make sure the hot water works. If the water doesn’t get hot, you’ll need to readjust the cartridge with the plastic nut tool and check again until you get hot water.

6Put the small spacer washer back onto the shaft. Slide the stop tube back onto the valve body. Replace the escutcheon plate and secure it with its two screws, turning them clockwise until snug. Put the plastic knob back on, screw it in place, and secure the cover plate over the screw.

This helpful video will guide you through this process from start to finish:

Call for Free Estimates from Pros Now! [telnumlink] 1-866-342-3263[/telnumlink]

Shower Mildew & Shower Door Spots

Clear up problems with bathroom shower mildew and shower door spots with appropriate bathroom cleaners. These expert tips will help.

Mildew is a growing fungus that thrives in damp places such as bathrooms. Moisture-laden air condenses on cooler surfaces, including walls and ceilings. If that moisture isn’t cleaned away or doesn’t evaporate, it encourages the growth of tiny spores that become visible mildew and mold. This occasionally collects noticeably on shower doors and in corners of the shower.shower door spots

Regular cleaning with commercial shower cleaners usually prevents this. Or, to keep mildew off of the shower door, you can simply squeegee the door after showering.

If mildew is more widespread in the bathroom, consider the room’s ventilation. Warm areas, even when frequently wet like shower stalls, seldom grow mildew and mold if properly ventilated. If the bathroom does not have a bath fan, strongly consider installing one.[GARD align=”left”]

If the rubber that seals the glass door is mildewed, you can try cleaning it with a 6-to-1 mixture of water and household bleach (6 water, 1 bleach).

If the seal is damaged beyond repair, you may be able to have it replaced by a glass company or a shower-door installation specialist. Do-it-yourselfers may be able to buy replacement weatherstripping from the door’s manufacturer (if you can determine who that is). Or, in some cases, automotive weatherstripping can be modified to fit.

Clean Water Spots From Shower Door

Does your glass shower door have milky white spots all over it? Those spots are caused by residue from minerals in the water that has splattered on the door. It indicates that your household water has a high mineral content. Those mineral deposits are left behind when the water evaporates.

You can eliminate this problem at the source by installing a water softener, or you can find ways to reduce water-spotting–or at least clean them away–without buying equipment.

For starters, wipe up drips and drops when they occur, before they have a chance to form stains. Keep a squeegee in the shower and give the walls and door a quick wipe after each shower. This is a sure-fire method that almost always eliminates the problem.

If using a squeegee doesn’t do the trick, clean up those pesky spots with a citrus-based cleaning solvent; these are especially effective against organic stains.[GARD align=”right”]

shower mildew door spots adviceIf your shower is lined with marble, granite, or other stone tile, do not use a citrus-based cleaner–it may etch the finish on the stone.

Featured Resource: Get a Pre-Screened Local Shower Door Repair Pro

Shower Mildew & Shower Door Spots

Clear up problems with bathroom shower mildew and shower door spots with appropriate bathroom cleaners. These expert tips will help.

Mildew is a growing fungus that thrives in damp places such as bathrooms. Moisture-laden air condenses on cooler surfaces, including walls and ceilings. If that moisture isn’t cleaned away or doesn’t evaporate, it encourages the growth of tiny spores that become visible mildew and mold. This occasionally collects noticeably on shower doors and in corners of the shower.shower door spots

Regular cleaning with commercial shower cleaners usually prevents this. Or, to keep mildew off of the shower door, you can simply squeegee the door after showering.

If mildew is more widespread in the bathroom, consider the room’s ventilation. Warm areas, even when frequently wet like shower stalls, seldom grow mildew and mold if properly ventilated. If the bathroom does not have a bath fan, strongly consider installing one.[GARD align=”left”]

If the rubber that seals the glass door is mildewed, you can try cleaning it with a 6-to-1 mixture of water and household bleach (6 water, 1 bleach).

If the seal is damaged beyond repair, you may be able to have it replaced by a glass company or a shower-door installation specialist. Do-it-yourselfers may be able to buy replacement weatherstripping from the door’s manufacturer (if you can determine who that is). Or, in some cases, automotive weatherstripping can be modified to fit.

Clean Water Spots From Shower Door

Does your glass shower door have milky white spots all over it? Those spots are caused by residue from minerals in the water that has splattered on the door. It indicates that your household water has a high mineral content. Those mineral deposits are left behind when the water evaporates.

You can eliminate this problem at the source by installing a water softener, or you can find ways to reduce water-spotting–or at least clean them away–without buying equipment.

For starters, wipe up drips and drops when they occur, before they have a chance to form stains. Keep a squeegee in the shower and give the walls and door a quick wipe after each shower. This is a sure-fire method that almost always eliminates the problem.

If using a squeegee doesn’t do the trick, clean up those pesky spots with a citrus-based cleaning solvent; these are especially effective against organic stains.[GARD align=”right”]

shower mildew door spots adviceIf your shower is lined with marble, granite, or other stone tile, do not use a citrus-based cleaner–it may etch the finish on the stone.

Featured Resource: Get a Pre-Screened Local Shower Door Repair Pro

Waterfall Shower Heads & Panel Showers

This unbiased consumer guide helps you choose the best waterfall shower head or wall-mounted panel shower for the ultimate in a satisfying, massaging shower experience.

Today’s shower systems offer many ways to get wet. The most popular is still a fixed shower head installed about 78 inches off the floor and angled to spray at shoulder height. A more versatile option is a hand shower on a slide bar, which can accommodate bathers of different heights. But those are just the beginning of available options for showers. Here we look at two of the most popular options in specialty showers: waterfall shower heads and panel showers.

waterfall showerhead sprite

Waterfall shower head offers a satisfying cascade of water. Photo: Sprite Industries

Waterfall Shower Heads

An overhead waterfall shower head mounted in the ceiling provides a drenching effect, and can supplement a basic shower head. Look for a shower head that has holes in the center as well as around the perimeter for the best spray pattern. Waterfall shower heads are also available in wall-mount styles to replace conventional shower heads, as shown in the photo at right. Some shower heads have a range of settings that will let you select the water flow you prefer, from fine spray to coarse, as well as different pulsation levels for a water massage.

waterfall shower head massage

Waterfall shower head combines with massaging panel and handheld head for the ultimate in a shower experience. Photo: Decor Star

Whole-Body Panel Showers

Wall-mounted spray jets can be combined with an overhead system to create a whole-body panel shower. These “surround” designs have controls that let you use just a few jets at once, and individual volume controls for each bank of two or three jets. At the high end of the price spectrum, they can cost $300 or more.

Be sure that the highest jets can be turned off separately so that they won’t spray short people in the face. You’ll also need a shutoff valve so you can take an ordinary shower if you want to.

Specialty Shower Controls

If you’re planning a very elaborate shower installation that involves installing several different shower heads, be aware that it can be tricky to coordinate multiple water sources. You may find it worthwhile to have your system professionally designed so you won’t be plagued by temperature and pressure fluctuations.

A shower system’s command center is the control valve. It turns the water on and off, adjusts the shower temperature, and controls how much water goes to the shower head and any side sprays. Its capacity determines how many spray options your system can include.[GARD align=”right”]

waterfall shower head adviceA multispray shower can use 50 gallons of water in eight to ten minutes, so your water bill is likely to go up and you may need a second (or larger) water heater to meet the demand for longer or consecutive showers.

Many cities now require the use of low-flow shower heads in remodels; whether or not one is required, you may want to install this type to reduce your water bill. If you decide to buy a water-saving shower head, don’t try to cut costs: Inexpensive models often deliver a paltry drizzle that cools off as it falls. See more in the Low-Flow Shower Head Buying Guide.

Featured Resource: Get a Pre-Screened Local Plumbing Pro

Call for free estimates from local pros now:
[telnumlink] 1-866-342-3263[/telnumlink]

Waterfall Shower Heads & Panel Showers

This unbiased consumer guide helps you choose the best waterfall shower head or wall-mounted panel shower for the ultimate in a satisfying, massaging shower experience.

Today’s shower systems offer many ways to get wet. The most popular is still a fixed shower head installed about 78 inches off the floor and angled to spray at shoulder height. A more versatile option is a hand shower on a slide bar, which can accommodate bathers of different heights. But those are just the beginning of available options for showers. Here we look at two of the most popular options in specialty showers: waterfall shower heads and panel showers.

waterfall showerhead sprite

Waterfall shower head offers a satisfying cascade of water. Photo: Sprite Industries

Waterfall Shower Heads

An overhead waterfall shower head mounted in the ceiling provides a drenching effect, and can supplement a basic shower head. Look for a shower head that has holes in the center as well as around the perimeter for the best spray pattern. Waterfall shower heads are also available in wall-mount styles to replace conventional shower heads, as shown in the photo at right. Some shower heads have a range of settings that will let you select the water flow you prefer, from fine spray to coarse, as well as different pulsation levels for a water massage.

waterfall shower head massage

Waterfall shower head combines with massaging panel and handheld head for the ultimate in a shower experience. Photo: Decor Star

Whole-Body Panel Showers

Wall-mounted spray jets can be combined with an overhead system to create a whole-body panel shower. These “surround” designs have controls that let you use just a few jets at once, and individual volume controls for each bank of two or three jets. At the high end of the price spectrum, they can cost $300 or more.

Be sure that the highest jets can be turned off separately so that they won’t spray short people in the face. You’ll also need a shutoff valve so you can take an ordinary shower if you want to.

Specialty Shower Controls

If you’re planning a very elaborate shower installation that involves installing several different shower heads, be aware that it can be tricky to coordinate multiple water sources. You may find it worthwhile to have your system professionally designed so you won’t be plagued by temperature and pressure fluctuations.

A shower system’s command center is the control valve. It turns the water on and off, adjusts the shower temperature, and controls how much water goes to the shower head and any side sprays. Its capacity determines how many spray options your system can include.[GARD align=”right”]

waterfall shower head adviceA multispray shower can use 50 gallons of water in eight to ten minutes, so your water bill is likely to go up and you may need a second (or larger) water heater to meet the demand for longer or consecutive showers.

Many cities now require the use of low-flow shower heads in remodels; whether or not one is required, you may want to install this type to reduce your water bill. If you decide to buy a water-saving shower head, don’t try to cut costs: Inexpensive models often deliver a paltry drizzle that cools off as it falls. See more in the Low-Flow Shower Head Buying Guide.

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