Plywood & Panel Siding Archives - HomeTips Plywood & Panel Siding Archives - HomeTips
Select Page
url is https://dev.hometips.com:443/category/roofing-siding/plywood-panel-siding

Repairing Hardboard & Plywood Siding

Expert advice on how to repair and replace plywood and hardboard siding, including how to fill holes, remove stains and patch damaged areas.

The worst enemy of any wood-based siding is moisture. Here’s how to repair hardboard or plywood siding that has been compromised by the elements:

Repairing Hardboard Siding

If water seeps into joints between hardboard panels or penetrates through small holes, it will cause the panels to deteriorate. Immediately fill holes with a flexible, all- purpose filler such as pre-mixed bridging and patching compound, following label directions. Sand the area smooth, and then paint it to match the rest of the siding. For deep holes, build up the patch with several successive layers, allowing each to dry before applying the next.[GARD align=”left”]

Buckling is usually another sign of moisture. Any buckled or moisture-damaged hardboard siding must be replaced. Check your manufacturer’s warranty, or ask a lumberyard about consumer information on your type of siding.

To remove stains from hardboard siding, wash it with a mild detergent. Oil-based stains may require scrubbing with a solvent. If stains don’t come out this way, you may have to resort to sanding the area and refinishing it, but, before you go this route, be sure you can match the color of the existing finish.

Repairing Plywood Siding

When plywood’s surface veneer becomes weatherworn, it may crack, or “check,” and begin to peel.

When plywood siding ages, it’s often easiest to replace entire panels.

Repair is easy, but the trick is to match the finish on the patched area. You will need paint or stain that is an exact match, so test your replacement finish somewhere on the siding where it will not show.

Sand down the cracked area and apply a flexible, all-purpose exterior vinyl spackling compound, using a putty knife. Smooth the patch before it hardens. Allow it to dry, lightly sand the patched area, and finish it to match your siding.[GARD align=”left”]

When the sandwich-like plies of plywood separate, it usually means that water has penetrated the material and compromised the glue. To remedy this, force waterproof carpenter’s glue into the area between plies, and then nail with galvanized common nails. Be sure the edges of the plywood are properly flashed with sheet metal or caulked to prevent moisture from getting back in. And be sure the plywood has a durable finish.

For plywood that has numerous delaminations or serious damage, replace the entire sheet.

Get a Pre-Screened Local Siding Repair Pro

Plywood & Panel Siding

Repairing Hardboard & Plywood Siding

Expert advice on how to repair and replace plywood and hardboard siding, including how to fill holes, remove stains and patch damaged areas.

The worst enemy of any wood-based siding is moisture. Here’s how to repair hardboard or plywood siding that has been compromised by the elements:

Repairing Hardboard Siding

If water seeps into joints between hardboard panels or penetrates through small holes, it will cause the panels to deteriorate. Immediately fill holes with a flexible, all- purpose filler such as pre-mixed bridging and patching compound, following label directions. Sand the area smooth, and then paint it to match the rest of the siding. For deep holes, build up the patch with several successive layers, allowing each to dry before applying the next.[GARD align=”left”]

Buckling is usually another sign of moisture. Any buckled or moisture-damaged hardboard siding must be replaced. Check your manufacturer’s warranty, or ask a lumberyard about consumer information on your type of siding.

To remove stains from hardboard siding, wash it with a mild detergent. Oil-based stains may require scrubbing with a solvent. If stains don’t come out this way, you may have to resort to sanding the area and refinishing it, but, before you go this route, be sure you can match the color of the existing finish.

Repairing Plywood Siding

When plywood’s surface veneer becomes weatherworn, it may crack, or “check,” and begin to peel.

When plywood siding ages, it’s often easiest to replace entire panels.

Repair is easy, but the trick is to match the finish on the patched area. You will need paint or stain that is an exact match, so test your replacement finish somewhere on the siding where it will not show.

Sand down the cracked area and apply a flexible, all-purpose exterior vinyl spackling compound, using a putty knife. Smooth the patch before it hardens. Allow it to dry, lightly sand the patched area, and finish it to match your siding.[GARD align=”left”]

When the sandwich-like plies of plywood separate, it usually means that water has penetrated the material and compromised the glue. To remedy this, force waterproof carpenter’s glue into the area between plies, and then nail with galvanized common nails. Be sure the edges of the plywood are properly flashed with sheet metal or caulked to prevent moisture from getting back in. And be sure the plywood has a durable finish.

For plywood that has numerous delaminations or serious damage, replace the entire sheet.

Get a Pre-Screened Local Siding Repair Pro

Plywood & Panel Siding

Plywood & Panel Siding

How to buy plywood, wood board and hardboard siding, including advantages and drawbacks, with wood siding installation and repair tips.

Wood clapboard siding has long set the bar as the preferred look and choice of siding on North American homes.

Plywood siding covers large expanses quickly and can conform to curves.

But, because wood board siding is expensive and increasingly scarce, several manufactured wood-based materials have become extremely popular alternatives. The main ones are plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), and hardboard. Sold both in large panels and in clapboard-style boards, these products are significantly less expensive than real wood and offer effective usage of wood by-products.

In this section of HomeTips, you will find buying guide information that will help you sort through the advantages and drawbacks of these manufactured siding materials. And you’ll get help with DIY installation, as well as cleaning, repair, and general care.

Advantages of Plywood Siding

Able to add great structural support to a wall, plywood is valued not only for this feature but also for its ease of installation with only basic carpentry skills and tools. Its primary drawbacks are that it can “check” (show small surface cracks) and, like all wood, is flammable.

The most common plywood species are Douglas fir, Western red cedar, redwood, and Southern pine, making for a broad range of textures and patterns. Sheets come 4 feet wide and 8 to 10 feet long. Lap boards are 6 to 12 inches wide and 16 feet long. Thicknesses of both are 3/8 to 5/8 inch.

With the proper maintenance, plywood siding can last from 30 years to the life of your home. Before installing, seal all edges with water repellent, stain sealer, or exterior house paint primer. Then re-stain or re-paint your house every five years.

The major enemies of plywood siding are termites and moisture. You can avoid termite damage by ensuring that the siding does not come into contact with the soil, and water rot by making sure the siding is properly finished and maintained.

Pros of Hardboard & OSB Siding

Hardboard and OSB siding are engineered wood products that can offer many benefits. A large part of the attraction is the price; hardboard and OSB are usually less expensive than solid wood. Hardboard and OSB also come in many styles and designs, ranging from traditional lap siding to rustic board-and-batten to even a stucco lookalike.

Others appreciate hardboard and OSB’s smooth surface, which finishes quite well. But while this uniform surface, free of knots and other defects, can be a virtue, it also can lack the character of solid wood. Most agree, however, that wood-composite siding looks more “natural” than vinyl or aluminum.

Panels come in 4-by-8 or 4-by-10-foot dimensions, and lap siding boards come 16 feet long, 4–16 inches wide, and usually 7/16- or 1/2-inch thick. Hardboard and OSB sidings are usually prefinished in the factory and sometimes come stained or prepainted, as well.

While hardboard and OSB siding have been marketed for their strength and durability, they are not the best choice for all homeowners, particularly those who live in damp or rainy climates. Moisture has been known to be a problem if allowed to seep around (or in some cases through) the finish and into the wood fibers themselves, resulting in expansion, buckling, and rot. If considering hardboard or OSB, be sure to discuss these concerns with your retailer and research manufacturers carefully.

Always prime or seal your hardboard or OSB siding before installation; be sure to cover all edges. Composite siding can be easy and quick to install, particularly varieties that are long and lightweight.

To prevent moisture problems, install siding a minimum of 6 inches off the ground, keep sprinkler water from hitting the surface, and ensure that garden mulch does not build up against the siding. Inspect your siding regularly, checking for damage to the paint job or where seams meet. Repaint the siding approximately every five years to maximize its lifespan.

Also See:

Repairing Hardboard & Plywood Siding

Featured Resource: Get a Pre-Screened Local Wood Siding Contractor

Plywood & Panel Siding

Plywood & Panel Siding

How to buy plywood, wood board and hardboard siding, including advantages and drawbacks, with wood siding installation and repair tips.

Wood clapboard siding has long set the bar as the preferred look and choice of siding on North American homes.

Plywood siding covers large expanses quickly and can conform to curves.

But, because wood board siding is expensive and increasingly scarce, several manufactured wood-based materials have become extremely popular alternatives. The main ones are plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), and hardboard. Sold both in large panels and in clapboard-style boards, these products are significantly less expensive than real wood and offer effective usage of wood by-products.

In this section of HomeTips, you will find buying guide information that will help you sort through the advantages and drawbacks of these manufactured siding materials. And you’ll get help with DIY installation, as well as cleaning, repair, and general care.

Advantages of Plywood Siding

Able to add great structural support to a wall, plywood is valued not only for this feature but also for its ease of installation with only basic carpentry skills and tools. Its primary drawbacks are that it can “check” (show small surface cracks) and, like all wood, is flammable.

The most common plywood species are Douglas fir, Western red cedar, redwood, and Southern pine, making for a broad range of textures and patterns. Sheets come 4 feet wide and 8 to 10 feet long. Lap boards are 6 to 12 inches wide and 16 feet long. Thicknesses of both are 3/8 to 5/8 inch.

With the proper maintenance, plywood siding can last from 30 years to the life of your home. Before installing, seal all edges with water repellent, stain sealer, or exterior house paint primer. Then re-stain or re-paint your house every five years.

The major enemies of plywood siding are termites and moisture. You can avoid termite damage by ensuring that the siding does not come into contact with the soil, and water rot by making sure the siding is properly finished and maintained.

Pros of Hardboard & OSB Siding

Hardboard and OSB siding are engineered wood products that can offer many benefits. A large part of the attraction is the price; hardboard and OSB are usually less expensive than solid wood. Hardboard and OSB also come in many styles and designs, ranging from traditional lap siding to rustic board-and-batten to even a stucco lookalike.

Others appreciate hardboard and OSB’s smooth surface, which finishes quite well. But while this uniform surface, free of knots and other defects, can be a virtue, it also can lack the character of solid wood. Most agree, however, that wood-composite siding looks more “natural” than vinyl or aluminum.

Panels come in 4-by-8 or 4-by-10-foot dimensions, and lap siding boards come 16 feet long, 4–16 inches wide, and usually 7/16- or 1/2-inch thick. Hardboard and OSB sidings are usually prefinished in the factory and sometimes come stained or prepainted, as well.

While hardboard and OSB siding have been marketed for their strength and durability, they are not the best choice for all homeowners, particularly those who live in damp or rainy climates. Moisture has been known to be a problem if allowed to seep around (or in some cases through) the finish and into the wood fibers themselves, resulting in expansion, buckling, and rot. If considering hardboard or OSB, be sure to discuss these concerns with your retailer and research manufacturers carefully.

Always prime or seal your hardboard or OSB siding before installation; be sure to cover all edges. Composite siding can be easy and quick to install, particularly varieties that are long and lightweight.

To prevent moisture problems, install siding a minimum of 6 inches off the ground, keep sprinkler water from hitting the surface, and ensure that garden mulch does not build up against the siding. Inspect your siding regularly, checking for damage to the paint job or where seams meet. Repaint the siding approximately every five years to maximize its lifespan.

Also See:

Repairing Hardboard & Plywood Siding

Featured Resource: Get a Pre-Screened Local Wood Siding Contractor

Plywood & Panel Siding

Shopping cart

Subtotal
Shipping and discount codes are added at checkout.
Checkout